Vaccine Information

Vaccine Information

Female patient

Vaccines Against COVID-19

We understand you may have questions about the COVID-19 vaccines. Connecticut has expanded eligibility to all residents 5 and older. For the most up to date information, visit your city or state’s COVID-19 vaccine sites: Connecticut,  Massachusetts, New York City, and New York state. You can also find trusted information on vaccine safety, doses, and more on the CDC’s webpage or at COVID.gov.

Availability

The FDA has approved or authorized three vaccines for COVID-19. Visit your city or state’s COVID-19 vaccine sites for information: ConnecticutMassachusettsNew York City, and New York state.

All residents 16 and over are eligible for a vaccine in Connecticut. Residents 5 and older are eligible for the Pfizer vaccine at some locations. For the most up-to-date information, you can visit the Connecticut website.

All residents 16 and over are eligible for a vaccine in Massachusetts. Residents 5 and older are eligible for the Pfizer vaccine at some locations. For the most up-to-date information, you can visit the Massachusetts website.

Children 5 and older can now receive the Pfizer vaccine against COVID-19. If you have questions about the vaccine, speak to your child’s doctor. To find appointments near you, visit your city or states COVID-19 vaccine sites: ConnecticutMassachusettsNew York City, and New York state.

The CDC recommends that people who have recovered from COVID-19 get vaccinated. Experts don’t know how long you are protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. You should wait 90 days before getting a COVID vaccine if you were treated with monoclonal antibodies or convalescent plasma. It’s important to keep practicing hand hygiene, mask wearing, and avoiding crowds whenever possible. Stay up to date on current vaccine guidance on the CDC’s webpage.

The FDA has authorized Pfizer and Moderna third doses for individuals with compromised immune systems (like people with cancer or who had organ transplants). A third dose is a full dose of the vaccine at least 4 weeks after the second dose. If you think you, or your child (5 and older), have a compromised immune system, talk to your doctor about whether you should receive a third dose of an approved vaccine.

 You may be eligible for Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson (J&J) Janssen boosters if you:

  • Are 18 years or older.
  • Received two doses of Pfizer or Moderna at least 5 months ago.
  • Received a J&J Janssen vaccine at least 2 months ago.

You can receive any of the three COVID-19 vaccines as the booster dose, but the CDC highly recommends the Pfizer or Moderna boosters.

Individuals 12 to 17 years old may receive a Pfizer booster.

You can stay up to date by visiting the CDC or your city or states COVID-19 vaccine sites: Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York City, and New York state

 

Eligible for a Booster Booster Type When

All individuals with compromised immune systems.

Pfizer or Moderna third dose and Pfizer or Moderna Booster

Patients should wait at least 4 weeks after their second dose before receiving a third dose. They should also wait until five months after their second Pfizer or Moderna dose before receiving a booster.

Individuals 18+ who received Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

Pfizer, Moderna, or J&J’s Janssen booster

Patients should wait until five months after their second Pfizer or Moderna dose before receiving a booster. The CDC highly recommends the Pfizer or Moderna boosters.

Individuals 16-17 years old who received Pfizer vaccines

Pfizer booster

Patients should wait until five months after their second Pfizer dose before receiving a booster.

Individuals 18+ who received J&J’s Janssen vaccine.

Pfizer, Moderna, or J&J’s Janssen booster

 

Patients should wait at least 2 months after their first Janssen dose before receiving a booster. The CDC highly recommends the Pfizer or Moderna boosters.

Individuals 18 and older may be able to receive a booster different from the vaccine they originally received. Speak to your doctor to see if mixing booster shots is right for you. 

It’s important to have a conversation with your doctor about the vaccines and if they are right for you and your family. When you or your child have an opportunity to be vaccinated, make sure to speak with your doctor to discuss family and personal health history to help you decide. You can stay up to date on current vaccine guidance on the CDC’s webpage.

The CDC recently recommended that individuals 50 and older or immunocompromised individuals 18 and older can choose to receive a second booster at least 4 months after their first booster. Speak to your doctor to see if you should receive a second booster.

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Coverage

The FDA- approved or authorized COVID-19 vaccines will be covered under your plan. In some situations, the government may cover the vaccine cost. Members will pay $0 out-of-pocket for both doses of the vaccine they receive. This applies whether you visit health care providers in or out of our network.

When publicly available, members will pay $0 out-of-pocket at both in- and out-of-network providers to be vaccinated. That means no copays, deductibles, or coinsurance will apply.

You can find more coverage and benefit updates due to COVID-19.

If you are eligible under CDC rules to receive a third dose or booster(s), you will pay $0 out-of-pocket. This means no copays, deductibles or coinsurance will apply. 

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Protecting Yourself

The best ways to help keep you and your family safe from COVID-19 are to:

  • Get vaccinated and stay up to date with needed boosters.
  • Wash your hands often and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth following your state’s guidance. Review the CDC mask guidance to know when they are needed. 
  • Monitor your health for any COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Stay home if you are sick.

Viruses commonly change through mutation and new variants are expected over time. The new variants of COVID-19 are reported to spread more easily and quickly. Scientists are working hard to learn more about them.

Research released from the makers of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines show that the vaccine provides some protection from the new COVID-19 variants, including Delta. Boosters provide protection against severe disease from Omicron.

It’s important to continue taking some precautions. Getting both doses of either vaccine on time is just one of the ways you can help prevent the spread of COVID-19. After getting the vaccine and booster(s), the best ways to help keep you and your family safe from COVID-19 are to:

  • Wash your hands often and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
  • Wear a mask over your nose and mouth following your state’s guidance. Review the CDC mask guidance to know when they are needed.
  • Monitor your health for any COVID-19 symptoms.
  • Stay home if you are sick.

The precautions you take depend on your personal circumstances, vaccination and booster status, and state rules. Visit your state’s COVID sites for updates to guidance.

Getting both doses of the vaccine on time, and recommended booster(s) when eligible, is just one of the ways you can help prevent the spread of COVID-19. The CDC recently updated the language they use to describe vaccination status.

You are fully vaccinated when you have:

  • Received both vaccine doses (The Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine, however, is only one dose.) and
  • It has been at least two weeks since your last dose.

You are up to date on your vaccines when you have:

  • Received the full course of COVID-19 vaccines (see above) and
  • Received appropriate booster(s) based on your circumstances. You can find out if you are up to date here.

You can find the most up to date recommendations on the CDC’s website. You should always check your state’s guidance for specific instructions.

You can see if you are in a category of people eligible to receive a vaccine by visiting the website for your state or city: Connecticut,  Massachusetts, New York City, and New York state

You can find trusted information on the COVID-19 vaccine, including safety, doses, and more on the CDC’s webpage or at COVID.gov.

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Disclaimer – The above is for your general information and not medical advice. The currently approved vaccinations may not be appropriate for everyone based on their specific medical conditions, history, and age. You should follow all vaccination instructions from the manufacturer and talk to your doctor if you have questions. If you receive additional services during your vaccination appointment, you may be responsible for copays, deductibles, coinsurance or out-of-network charges, according to your benefits plan.